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Tri Color Lame Fry
In Japanese Rice Fish For Sale
Outdoor breeding rack for Oryzias latipes(medaka, japanese rice fish) in the Midwest
In Builds/Projects
Sooo... anyone wanna sell some fish ;)
In Japanese Rice Fish For Sale
Nervous Newbie
In Builds/Projects
Joe S
Founding Member
Apr 02, 2022
Hi there! Just providing my experience - I really wouldn't worry about temperatures too much, they're a really hardy fish (literally had them in water that froze over and they were fine), but if you want to get a colony going, I would keep them inside for now and take an active role in breeding them. If you're not going in and taking out the eggs and raising them in a separate container, then a lot of eggs and young fry are probably getting snatched up for dinner by the other fish. I've bred them out a couple of different ways, either by moving the fish (need more tanks) or by moving the eggs (requires more work). Basically, I would just feed lots of live foods, keep them fat and happy, and let them live in a well planted 10 gallon. Depending on how much space I had to work with, I would either 1) move all of the adults to a different tank and just let the eggs they'd laid grow out naturally, or 2) add nylon yarn spawning mops to the tank, and then take it out, and manually remove eggs. Then, take the eggs and put them in a big ole deli cup (think like a large takeout soup container) with tank water, a drop of methylene blue (for fungus), and a gentle air stone. Rice fish eggs are really easy to spot, and it can be kind of enjoyable to remove them from the yarn (or mind-numbingly dull after the 5 millionth time). If you're going the manual route, it's easier to target feed the fry appropriate sized foods (vinegar eels, BBS, etc.). If you have well planted tanks and move the adults around between different tanks, then allowing the babies to grow up in an otherwise empty tank, they should find more than enough infusoria around all of the plants to get them to a size where they'll take to BBS. You probably won't get quite as many this way, but if you're just looking to raise a generation with pretty minimal hassle and have the tanks set-up, it's an option. All that to say, I've also bred them outdoors in a pond - it can work fine, but depending on the size of the pond and the availability of food around, it's easy for them to become snacks to the older fish. If you don't have too many and want to play it safe, then I think keeping them indoors and under a watchful eye will do you well. Best of luck and keep us updated.
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Joe S

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